Plan Your Visit to the National Museum of Military Vehicles

Chosin Reservoir
Puller Gallery: Commanding General O.P. Smith led his division through the bitter campaigns of the Korean conflict inclding the sub-zero winter drive north to the Chosin Reservoir. Download your free vacation planner!
MIM-23 HAWK Surface to Air Missile
Puller Gallery: The MIM-23 Homing All the Way Killer (HAWK) Surface-to-Air Missile, manufactured by Raytheon, was an American medium-range surface-to-air missile initially fielded in 1959. Download your free vacation planner!
American Light Tanks
Marshall Gallery: The Rotunda of American Combat Vehicles presents predominant categories of World War II American combat vehicles including Medium Tanks, Light Tanks, Armored Cars, Reconnaissance Vehicles, Halftracks, Artillery, Tank Recovery Vehicles and Tank Destroyers. Download your free vacation planner!


 

Free digital trip planning guide

Your Yellowstone National Park experience can include the National Museum of Military Vehicles, our nation’s world-class military history museum! Every day, tourists from around the world are awestruck at the incredible depth and detail found inside our Museum. We are passionate about excellence and we strive to create a world-class museum experience for every guest that walks through our doors. Plan your visit today!


Why should you visit?

You may not expect it in a small Wyoming town so close to Jackson Hole and Yellowstone National Park, but the National Museum of Military Vehicles is our nation's premier, world-class military history museum.

We're dedicated to honoring the service and sacrifice of veterans and their families and active-duty servicemen and women. We tell their stories in three major galleries through immersive exhibits with a current focus on World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.

In total, the 140,000 sq. foot Museum currently displays the world’s largest private collection of over 500 fully restored military vehicles. Also, the Museum presents a historically significant major firearms collection that includes the fully authenticated musket that fired the first shot in the Revolutionary War Battle of Bunker Hill.

Driving to the Museum

From Jackson

The National Museum of Military Vehicles is closer to Jackson than is Yellowstone's Old Faithful. And, the drive is less crowded but equally as scenic. You’ll head north from Jackson, see the incredibly breathtaking Grand Tetons, and then bisect the Wind and Gros Ventre mountain ranges at an elevation of 9,658 feet when you will drive over Togwotee Pass. Take a moment and look back at the Teton Range from this perspective and you’ll see what millions of other visitors miss. It’s breathtaking. Then keep driving on what is considered by many as one of the most scenic drives in the country. But it doesn’t end there. A few more miles and you’ll be near Brooks Lake and see the stunning Cliffs Of The Continental Divide. Take a pit stop in Dubois, one of America’s great western (and not crowded) towns, and another eight miles you’ll find us at the Museum.

Virtual drive from Jackson

Let's be frank, the drive from Jackson Hole, Wyoming to the National Museum of Military Vehicles is one of most scenic drives in the United States (once you get away from the crowds, that is).

From Denver

While driving to the Museum from Denver, you will see the vast, wide-open spaces of Wyoming. After crossing the route of the Transcontinental Railroad, you will also cross many of the trails used by pioneers during western covered wagon emigration including the Oregon Trail, Morman Trail and the Overland Trail to name a few. Also, you’ll see portions of the routes used by the Pony Express. Visitors can also experience the history of the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone Tribes on the Wind River Reservation or stop at historic Fort Laramie on their way to the Museum.

From Salt Lake City

A trip to the National Museum of Military Vehicles from Salt Lake City takes you over South Pass, the lowest point on the Continental Divide between the Central and Southern Rocky Mountains. The passes furnish a natural crossing point of the Rockies and became the route for emigrants on the Oregon, California, and Mormon trails to the West during the 19th century. South Pass was designated as a U.S. National Historic Landmark in 1961. Visitors can explore the history of South Pass either before or after their trip to the Museum in historic Atlantic City, Wyoming, founded as a mining camp following the 1867 gold rush in the region.